North Carolina Policyholders: Notice to policyholders recently affected by severe weather. 

DCs traveling with sports teams should consider the Sports Medicine Licensure Clarity Act.

What You Need to Know About "Travel to Treat."

As sports begin to open back up, some DCs are preparing to travel and treat athletic teams again. The Sports Medicine Licensure Clarity Act provides greater clarity around that practice.

Dr. Karlos Boghosian, president of the Federation of Chiropractic Licensing Boards, weighs in on the Sports Medicine Licensure Clarity Act.

Thanks to the Sports Medicine Licensure Clarity Act, passed in 2018, it has become easier for doctors of chiropractic affiliated with sports teams to travel with their teams and provide treatment. Does this legislation effectively open up licensure for doctors to practice full travel to treat, or are there limitations on the scope of the new law?

"This act is very specific in its intent," says Dr. Boghosian. "It is only for healthcare providers who have written agreements with their team or program. You have notified their liability insurance of the terms of the agreement and you are providing care at the event facility."

Additionally, the practitioner is balanced by:

  • Jurisdiction scope of practice, meaning any care must be permitted in both states; both states must have substantially similar licensure requirements
  • The practitioner cannot offer any type of health care outside of the event facility.

"Even with this narrow window, there is gray area and it hasn't been determined yet how the state's existing travel to treat law intersects with this act," Dr. Boghosian says. "Ultimately, the Sports Medicine Licensure Clarity Act is a very specific response to a very specific problem. And as we always say in chiropractic, even the smallest steps forward are progress. As this act gets used and tested, we'll learn more about possible pit falls and considerations for broader solutions in the future."


Hear more from Dr. Boghosian, including his thoughts on practicing telehealth with patients located in states where the DC isn’t licensed, on the latest episode of our Chiropractical podcast.

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