Assess Your Skills and Strengths

Throughout your chiropractic career, it's important to assess your skills and your strengths. You may find, over time, that changes in these areas may have an impact on your practice.

Planning

Assess Your Skills and Strengths

Understanding your skills and strengths can help throughout your career. It's an opportunity for reflection to provide greater awareness of what you have to offer and where you may want to focus as a Doctor of Chiropractic. A self-assessment can also help you better communicate with others about your specific strengths. You may have something unique to offer patients - and the community - that will be beneficial to them.


How An Assessment Can Help

If you are looking for a position as an associate or independent contractor, a self-assessment will be beneficial in selling yourself to a hiring D.C. When hiring doctors are considering the CVs of several candidates, their first decision is who to interview. Most doctors start by comparing the skills and strengths of the various candidates. You’ll need to find a way to make your CV stand out from the crowd.

If you are planning to open your own practice – or are planning to expand or partner with another D.C. – understanding your strengths, your values and your interests can help make decisions that can ultimately help your practice grow.

Assessing your specific skills in the following categories will help you identify your talents and strengths.

Knowledge-Based Skills

These are skills you learned through experience and education and can be directly related to chiropractic, or gained while working during college or in a previous profession. Examples of knowledge-based skills might be:

  • Ultrasound and electronic stimulation rehabilitation
  • Diversified, SOT and Gonstead techniques
  • Chiropractic software training-SOAP notes, scheduling, billing
  • Transferable skills

The skills and strengths that could be valued by a potential employer or partner are called transferable skills. Under this heading, you might list:

  • Problem solving
  • Time management
  • Experience with budgets
  • Personal traits/strengths

Then, there are the personal attributes others will see as definite strengths. Examples might include:

  • Friendly
  • Quick learner
  • Flexible
  • Good sense of humor
  • Dedicated chiropractor

To help you begin to see how you can differentiate yourself from others, create a list of your skills and strengths.
 


The information in the NCMIC Learning Center is offered solely for general information and educational purposes. It is not offered as, nor does it represent, legal or professional advice. Neither does this information constitute a guideline, practice parameter or standard of care. You should not act or rely upon this information without seeking the advice of an attorney familiar with the specific legal requirements of the state(s) in which you practice. If there is a discrepancy between the site and an insurance policy you have with NCMIC, the policy will prevail.