What Your Practice Says About You

You've worked hard to build your reputation as a forward-thinking D.C. Be sure your practice reflects who you are.

Patient Experience

What Your Practice Says About You

You read the professional journals. You listen to vendors. You keep up with trends and latest advancements. You clearly take pride in being up-to-date in your treatment strategies. You have a forward thinking practice.


But does your office reflect this?

Look around. When was the last time you purchased a new table? Sure your patients can’t see the duct tape that holds together the crack in the upholstery, but it is there. Lasers certainly have a place in your practice, but you haven’t pulled the trigger on purchasing one.

You could free up your office staff by allowing your patients to check themselves in with simple technology, but you don’t have the tablet or computer to do it. Those big, clunky computer monitors of the 1990s not only consume a lot of energy and take up a lot of room, but more than the outdated colors in your waiting room, they pay homage to an earlier decade.

Some of this is superficial, but it matters.

Consumers are savvy shoppers.  They look at the surface, as well as ask the important questions when making decisions. Your practice is no different. They will notice the details that may be saying this office is up-to-date, or worse, this office is behind the times.

It’s easy to put off investing in your practice when you have a full roster of patients, but what are they telling their friends – your referrals. No one likes to spend money if they don’t have to, but your office says a lot about you. 

When you decide to update your practice and need the funding to do so, be sure to check out financing options through NCMIC.  


The information in the NCMIC Learning Center is offered solely for general information and educational purposes. It is not offered as, nor does it represent, legal or professional advice. Neither does this information constitute a guideline, practice parameter or standard of care. You should not act or rely upon this information without seeking the advice of an attorney familiar with the specific legal requirements of the state(s) in which you practice. If there is a discrepancy between the site and an insurance policy you have with NCMIC, the policy will prevail.