Creating a Logo

Your practice logo doesn't have to be expensive or elaborate. Make sure it accurately portrays your brand.

Marketing

Creating a Logo

A logo is a unique mark that identifies your practice and represents your brand. It should be used repeatedly and consistently wherever possible. Resist the urge to change your logo because it takes repeated exposure for individuals to recognize your logo and connect it to your practice.


There Are Three Types of Logos:

  1. Font-based logos that are primarily a type treatment (like Home Depot, CNN and Sony)
  2. Logos that illustrate what you do (a paintbrush that is incorporated into a painter’s logo)
  3. Abstract graphic symbols (Nike swoosh, Olympic rings)

Take a look at other logos to determine what looks good – and what doesn’t. Consider the font used, the type treatment and color. Then, try to see the logo appears on various materials, including letterhead, business cards, outdoor signs and website.

When creating a practice logo, there are several options to choose from, depending on the amount you want to spend.

If you search online, you’ll find options for creating a logo. Some are very simplistic especially if they are free. A few websites to review include:

• Vistaprint
• Logomaker
• Custom Logo

Another option, if you’re looking for something unique is to consider hiring a designer - whether it’s a freelance designer, marketing/advertising firm or even a college design student. Ask to see samples of other designs and interview the individual to determine if they have a good understanding of what you’re looking for in terms of design and budget.

Wherever you have a logo created, ask others to review the samples and provide input.

How to Use Your Logo

Once your logo is completed, use it on everything ... stationery, newsletters, brochures, ads, specialty items and signs. Remember, it is your image and will reflect your practice position and the professional image you want to portray. So, the more your prospective patients see it, the better!


The information in the NCMIC Learning Center is offered solely for general information and educational purposes. It is not offered as, nor does it represent, legal or professional advice. Neither does this information constitute a guideline, practice parameter or standard of care. You should not act or rely upon this information without seeking the advice of an attorney familiar with the specific legal requirements of the state(s) in which you practice. If there is a discrepancy between the site and an insurance policy you have with NCMIC, the policy will prevail.