5 Tips for Naming Your Practice

Everyone you know will probably have an opinion on what to name your practice. How do you handle the suggestions and advice?

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5 Tips for Naming Your Practice

A while back, Dr. Erin Palmer Combs provided some tips to D.C.s about naming their practice. As a relatively new D.C., she had a good perspective on the issues other new D.C.s might face. The ideas are still valuable for anyone preparing to start into practice or someone who may be making a move. Here's what Dr. Combs had to say:


Somewhere after student clinic, board exams, extensive demographic studies, sleepless nights and the big decision of where you're going to go, you have to think about what you're going to name your office.

As I'm sure you can imagine, everyone has their own opinion on this topic. Here are a few things to consider, because this decision is a highly personal one.

  • Are you returning to your hometown? Did you have a good reputation while there? (Honestly?) This might be a great time to capitalize on your good name.
  • Do you dream of satellite clinics and associates? This would be a time not to use your name. Being employed by Sunshine Chiropractic is much more appealing to the new hire than working for Dr. Smith's office.
  • Do you plan to change your name, or have you recently changed your name? This is the where many doctors get "lost." You are building your reputation and identity, and you only want to do it once.
  • Do you have a common name? One that is particularly difficult to spell or pronounce? Both of these factors can determine how often you might be confused with another doctor.
  • Do you plan to offer other services or rent space to other practitioners? Or, do you plan to work as a sole proprietor until the eventual day of your retirement?

The name of your practice sets the mood for what goes on inside, so make this decision carefully. Most importantly, remember that it's "your place," so there is no right or wrong answer to this question.


The information in the NCMIC Learning Center is offered solely for general information and educational purposes. It is not offered as, nor does it represent, legal or professional advice. Neither does this information constitute a guideline, practice parameter or standard of care. You should not act or rely upon this information without seeking the advice of an attorney familiar with the specific legal requirements of the state(s) in which you practice. If there is a discrepancy between the site and an insurance policy you have with NCMIC, the policy will prevail.