in your corner

Know what questions to ask about a company's claims team before you choose a plan.

Insurance

Who's In Your Corner?

When selecting malpractice insurance, one of the most important factors to consider is your defense team. After all, in the event of a malpractice allegation, you will rely on them from beginning to end.


Make sure you know what kind of claims support is provided by any company and plan you’re considering before you choose one.

Claims Representatives

If you report a claim, you’ll likely be teamed up with a claims representative from your malpractice insurance company. You will work closely with this person, so it’s important they have the knowledge and experience needed to help protect your reputation.

Don’t be afraid to ask how many years of experience they have. Specifically, ask if they specialize or are experts in chiropractic malpractice. Or, are chiropractic malpractice claims only a small part of their day-to-day responsibilities?

Also, the best claims representative is only effective if you can reach them with your questions and concerns. Ask how accessible they are – both before and during a malpractice allegation.

(Because speaking to a claims representative early may help you avoid a malpractice claim altogether, make sure that’s an option. Or, will they only talk to you after a claim is filed?)

Attorneys

Malpractice insurance companies have several attorneys they work with across the country. Your company will assign one to defend your case.

Many things can depend on the outcome of a malpractice allegation – your reputation, your practice and finances. You should feel confident in your attorney’s ability. 

Before you choose a malpractice insurance company, inquire about the attorneys they use. How familiar are they with chiropractic? Are they experienced in defending chiropractic malpractice cases? Does the insurance company offer attorneys any specialized training or resources?

Learn more about NCMIC’s Defense Team.


The information in the NCMIC Learning Center is offered solely for general information and educational purposes. It is not offered as, nor does it represent, legal or professional advice. Neither does this information constitute a guideline, practice parameter or standard of care. You should not act or rely upon this information without seeking the advice of an attorney familiar with the specific legal requirements of the state(s) in which you practice. If there is a discrepancy between the site and an insurance policy you have with NCMIC, the policy will prevail.