Get Ready for Your Interview-Part 2

Let's say you have an interview scheduled. How can you convince the hiring D.C. that you're the best candidate to join the practice? Find out more in the second part of this two-part series.

Get Hired

Get Ready for Your Interview-Part 2

You have an interview scheduled, and you already learned how to assess your goals, skills and accomplishments. Now it's time to practice the interview.


Start by gathering a list of possible interview questions, and then practice your answers for each one out loud in front of a mirror. Better yet, have a friend role-play with you and provide honest feedback about how you came across.

Common Interview Questions

Here are some common questions you can expect:

Tell me about yourself.

This is your opportunity to share what you would bring to the practice and to start the discussion of whether the position would be a good fit for you and the practice. Think of your answer as an elevator speech about your background and why you want to be a chiropractor. Start by describing your current situation (graduating soon or recently graduated) and a few of the key skills you learned in your education. This is just the opening for the interview, so keep it brief. Avoid restating word for word what’s on your CV/resume and cover letter.

Example: I completed my Doctor of Chiropractic degree at _________ in ________. During my studies, I discovered that I truly enjoy finding ways to help patients feel their best. This is why I became a chiropractor and I look forward to putting those skills to practical use for you. Through multiple internships and part-time work as a personal trainer, I gained valuable hands-on experience and had an opportunity to relate with a wide variety of people.

Why do you want to work for me?

This is where your earlier research about the practice pays off. You can share how your philosophy and specialty align with the practice's and will help the doctor meet his or her goals.

Example: I share your practice’s goals of achieving high standards and attention to detail. I also have a strong interest and background in sports-related injuries, which is one of your practice’s specialties. In addition, my philosophy about treating the entire patient and not just the individual symptoms aligns with how you practice chiropractic care. For these reasons, I believe your practice would be a good fit for me and vice versa.

Why should I hire you? 

In answering this question, it is important to focus on the hiring doctor and what they are looking for in a new hire. Do they want to grow? Do they want more time? Understanding why they are hiring will help both you and the doctor determine if the match will work.

Example: My ability to handle multiple tasks would be a definite asset in helping your busy chiropractic practice grow and run efficiently. I’m confident that I could help your practice become even more successful because we share a common philosophy about providing holistic care and I have the needed expertise to help you expand your practice.  

A Few Pre-Interview Details 

It is important to plan your interview attire ahead of time, purchasing what you need to make a positive first impression. You can’t go wrong with a dark-color, conservative suit (for both men and women).

Also determine the exact location and time of the interview a few days in advance. When you call to confirm, ask for the interviewer’s full name, correct pronunciation and the name of the practice. Google the location ahead of time and program it into your GPS, then plan to arrive about 10 minutes early so that you have time to relax and get a feel for the practice’s environment.

Bottom Line

Preparing in advance will increase your chances of landing your ideal D.C. position – one that is a good fit for both you and the hiring doctor. Here are tips to consider once you go to the actual interview.


The information in the NCMIC Learning Center is offered solely for general information and educational purposes. It is not offered as, nor does it represent, legal or professional advice. Neither does this information constitute a guideline, practice parameter or standard of care. You should not act or rely upon this information without seeking the advice of an attorney familiar with the specific legal requirements of the state(s) in which you practice. If there is a discrepancy between the site and an insurance policy you have with NCMIC, the policy will prevail.